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Catholic Theological Union 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1973-1974 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




Incorporated by the State of Illinois, 
as an Institution of Higher Education, 
November 27, 1967. 

Approved as a Degree-Granting Insti- 
tution by the Department of Higher Edu- 
cation, State of Illinois, September, 1969. 

Accredited by the American Association 
of Theological Schools, January, 1972. 

Accredited by the North Central Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
March, 1972. 

Charter Member, The Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools, 1970. 

Approved for Veterans' Benefits, Title 
38, U.S. Code, Chapter 36, September 23, 
1970. 

Authorized under Federal Law to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students, October 28, 
1971. 

Member of the National Catholic Edu- 
cational Association, The Association of 
Clinical Pastoral Education, The Midwest 
Association of Theological Schools, the 
Association of Chicago Theological Schools. 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1973-1974 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

Eastern Province 
Society of The Divine Word 

Northern Province 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 324-8000 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




4 CALENDAR 

5 GENERAL INFORMATION 

11 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

17 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

21 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

41 COURSES OF STUDY 

60 REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1973-1974 



Fall Quarter 

Sept. 24-28 : Orientation 

Sept. 28: Late registration 

Oct. 1: Fall Quarter begins 

Nov. 2: No classes 

Nov. 15: FYP intensive 

Nov. 22-25: Thanksgiving recess 

Dec. 5-6: Registration for Winter Quarter 

Dec. 10-14: Week of study and exams 

Dec. 14: Fall Quarter ends (4:00 P.M) 



Jan. 7 
Jan. 31 
Feb. 1 

Feb. 8-10 
Feb. 27-28 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 18-22 
Mar. 22 



Winter Quarter 

Winter Quarter begins; late registration 
FYP intensive 

Last date for M.A. comprehensive examinations 

for June graduation 
Mid-quarter weekend 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
No classes 

Week of study and exams 
Winter Quarter ends (4:00 P.M.) 



Spring Quarter 

Apr. 1: Spring Quarter begins; late registration; 

last date for submitting final draft of M.A. 
theses for June graduation 
Apr. 11-14: Easter recess 

Apr. 15: Last date for submitting final draft of M.Div. 

projects for June graduation 
Apr. 25: FYP intensive 
May 1: Final approval of M.A. theses and M.Div. 
projects due for June graduation 
May 15: Applications for degree candidacy due 
May 22-23: Registration for Fall Quarter 
May 27 No classes 
June 6-7: Examinations 
June 7: Spring Quarter ends (4:00 P.M.) 



4 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




HISTORY 
PURPOSE 

BUILDING AND LOCATION 

LIBRARY 

CLASSROOMS 

ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

FEES 



HISTORY OF CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



Catholic Theological Union was founded in 1967 as a creative 
response to the call for seminary reform sounded by Vatican Coun- 
cil II. 

Three religious orders sponsored the school: the Franciscans of 
Sacred Heart Province, the Servites of the Eastern U.S. Province, 
and the Passionists of Holy Cross Province. 

The school was granted corporate status by the State of Illinois 
in November, 1967. Classes began in the fall quarter of 1968, with 
a faculty of 24 and an enrollment of 108. 

In January, 1972, Catholic Theological Union was accredited by 
the American Association of Theological Schools. The North Cen- 
tral Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools granted accredita- 
tion in March, 1972. 

A fourth corporate member was added in July, 1970, when the 
Society of the Divine Word, Northern Province, joined the CTU 
venture. 

Nine additional orders have now designated Catholic Theological 
Union as an official theologate: the Augustinians (1968), the Nor- 
bertines (1968), the Society of the Precious Blood (1969), the 
Missionaries of the Sacred Heart (1969), the Congregation of the 
Holy Ghost (1971), the Claretians (1972), the Viatorians (1972), 
and the Xaverian Missionaries (1973). 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an association of five Protestant 
and three Roman Catholic Schools of Theology located in Hyde 
Park and the western suburbs. 

Catholic Theological Union is unique among U.S. seminaries. 
It is not a coalition of independent schools. Rather, the participating 
orders have closed their individual seminaries and merged their man- 
power and resources in one school, with one administration and 
faculty. Control is vested in the Board of Trustees. The school has 



6 



the advantages of unity of administration and breadth of tradition 
and support. It has been accepted by its peers in the world of theo- 
logical education. As it concludes its fifth year of operation, there 
is "solid ground for hope that this unique venture will continue to 
develop and prosper. 



PURPOSE OF CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

There is a living sense of purpose which guides a school more 
effectively than any written statement. From the very beginning it 
was understood that CTU would be a school for ministry. Theology 
would be directed to practice. The by-laws concisely stated this 
objective: "To train and teach men aspiring to the Roman Catholic 
priesthood so that they may be fully qualified to meet the require- 
ments of such priesthood." 

As the school became more aware of its identity, it came to under- 
stand that a comprehensive formulation of its purposes was neces- 
sary In preparation for accreditation, the Committee on Academic 
Affairs made up of five faculty members, four, students, and three 
administrators, addressed itself to this task. Some ten meetings 
were required before a statement that was acceptable to the C1U 
community was finally arrived at. The statement reads as follows: 

Catholic Theological Union is dedicated to the education 
of students interested in ministering to the contemporary world 
as Roman Catholic priests. It also welcomes students interested 
in graduate theological education in preparation for a variety 
of Christian ministries. 

Its vision of the effective minister includes a mastery of the 
Christian heritage, a basic understanding of the other religious 
traditions, individual maturity and sensitivity to the human and 
religious needs of men today, the ability for personal theologi- 
cal reflection and the communication of religious insights and 
values to others. 

It assures each participating community and diocese all the 
courses necessary for ordination in the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood. The school offers programs culminating in degrees of 



7 



Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Theology. The thrust 
of this school includes a strong academic program that en- 
courages serious theological research both on part of the faculty 
and of the students. 

Catholic Theological Union envisions itself as an integral 
part of the cluster of theological schools in the University 
area. Its role within the cluster is to offer a Roman Catholic 
presence and it commits itself to utilizing this ecumenical set- 
ting as far as possible in constructing its theological program. 

A statement of purpose and goals is never absolute. It is rather 
an attempt to state where we are at the moment. Such a statement 
would be expected to reflect the hopes, ambiguities, tensions, and 
contradictions that exist among the trustees, administration, faculty, 
students, and the institutions which the school serves. It is like a 
political platform which is broad enough to include the goals of 
all and at the same time not precise enough to include in detail the 
particular agenda of each interest group. The lack of precision is 
seen as a strength rather than a weakness. Precision can divide 
as well as unite. 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 

Catholic Theological Union is located in Hyde Park on Chicago's 
south side. This is a cosmopolitan, stably integrated community, 
with a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance are shop- 
ping centers, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake Michi- 
gan beaches and the Museum of Science and Industry. Downtown 
Chicago is less than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. More 
importantly, it is close to the University of Chicago and its renowned 
divinity school, and to several schools of theology in the area: 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology, Mead- 
ville Theological School, and the Bellarmine School of Theology. 
Extensive studies have concluded that the ideal location for a mod- 
ern school of ministry is in a large city, near a major university, 
with opportunity for ecumenical and educational collaboration with 
other schools of theology. Hyde Park admirably fulfills these requi- 
sites. 



8 



Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building contain- 
ing some 200 rooms. Three lower floors are occupied by administra- 
tive and faculty offices, the library, lounges and dining facilities. 
The upper six floors furnish residence for faculty and students, 
with individual community chapels and lounges. 

It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. Some 
communities prefer separate living arrangements. One group of 
Franciscans live in an apartment community near the school. The 
Augustinians reside about one mile from CTU. Holy Spirit Priory 
in nearby Kenwood serves as the Norbertine residence. The Divine 
Word community leases apartments owned by the Lutheran School 
of Theology. Servite Hall is located in two townhouses in a nearby 
housing development. 

An open seminary in a large city fosters and demands maturity 
and responsibility in the student. But no other environment chal- 
lenges the future priest to the kind of emotional and professional 
growth that he will need to minister in our society. 



LIBRARY 

The CTU library consists of 60,000 volumes, catalogued in the 
Library of Congress system. Of special value is the collection of 
5 000 volumes in Mission Studies and the History of Religions. Vir- 
tually all of the periodicals useful for theological studies and related 
areas of research, some 450 in number, are currently being received. 

Students of Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the seven other schools of the Chicago Cluster. The 
Cluster libraries are connected by teletype, which gives instant con- 
tact for inquiries concerning titles and other library sharing. A daily 
courier service circulates books and periodicals for inter-library loan. 
The total holdings of the Cluster schools number 570,000 volumes, 
the second largest assemblage of theological literature in this country. 

The library occupies the third floor of the CTU building. Besides 
stack rooms, there is a large reading and reference room, offices for 
staff, and cataloguing and work rooms. 

The library is under the direction of three professional librarians, 
who have extensive background in theology and library science. 



9 



CLASSROOMS 



The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is 
located at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By 
special arrangement one floor of this building, containing eight 
classrooms, has been made available to CTU. In addition, a num- 
ber of seminar rooms for smaller groups are located in the CTU 
building. As an incentive to cross-registration, each quarter two 
upper division courses are conducted in the Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and nearby Jackson Park, with golf 
and tennis facilities, are in easy walking distance from CTU. An 
arrangement is in effect by which CTU students make use of the 
Hyde Park YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, 
gymnasium, squash and hand ball. 



Y 



FEES 



Tuition 



$1,500.00 per year 
500.00 per quarter 

150.00 per course 



Special Students (for credit or audit) 



Student Activity Fee 



4.00 per quarter 

900.00 per year 
312.00 
288.00 
300.00 

750.00 per year 
250.00 per quarter 



Board 

First Quarter (9/24 to 12/14) 
Second Quarter (1/7 to 3/22) 
Third Quarter (3/23 to 6/9) . 



Room (9/17 to 6/12) 



Thesis Direction (M. Div. or M.A.) 150.00 
Registration Fee 10.00 



Graduation Fee 



25.00 



Transcript of Credits 

10 



2.00 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 
FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President 

Vice President and Dean 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Dei-, of Students 
Registrar 

Director of Library 



Paul Bechtold. CP. 
Gilbert Ostdiek, OJFJM. 
James Hartke, O.F.M. 
Robert Mallonee, S.V.D. 
John Paul M.SC. 
Kenneth O'Mallev, CP. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

John Donaghey. S.V.D. (Provincial) 

Vitus Dusdhinsky, O.F.M. (Provincial) 

Justin Ryska. O.S.M. (Provincial) 

Raymond Goedert. JC.D. 

Mark Hegener, O.F.M. 

Carol Frances Jegen. B.V.M, 

Robert Charles Kohl O.F.M. 

Augustine Kulbis, O.S.M. 

Edward McGuinn. S.V.D. 

Roger Mercuric*. CP. 

Daniel O'Mallev, O.S.M. 

12 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 



Eugene Ahner, S.V.D. 
Norman Bevan, CS.Sp. 
Michael Brophy, CP. 
Mark Brummel, C.M.F. 
James Friedel, O.S.A. 
Howard Kmak, O.S.M. 
J. Ward Loughlin, CS.Sp. 
Ivan Marchesin, S.X. 
Kenneth Morris, C.S.V. 
John Paul, M.S.C 
Harry Speckman, O.F.M. 
Alphonse Spilly, CPP.S. 
James Strommer, CP. 



FACULTY 



Ahner, Eugene, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; Ph.D. (Cand.), Fordham 
University, New York. 

Boberg, John, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Mission Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; D.Miss., Gregorian Uni- 
versity, Rome. 

Bonner, Dismas, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Canon Law; J.C.L., 
The Catholic University of America, Washington; J.C.D. The 
Catholic University of America, Washington. 



13 



Dideon, Lois, R.C. Instructor in Pastoral Psychology and Director 
of Group Reflective Sessions; A.B., University of Seattle; M.A. 
in Theology, Andover Newton Theological School, Newton 
Center, Massachusetts. 

Fournelle, Geron, O.F.M. Professor of Old Testament Studies; 
S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; L.G. 
in Sacred Scripture, Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome. 

Geaney, Dennis, O.S.A. Director of Field Education and Associate 
Professor of Ministry; A.B., Villanova University, Philadelphia; 
M.A. in Economics, Catholic University of America, Washing- 
ton. 

Gohmann, Myron, CP. Associate Director of Library; L.Hist.E., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, 111. 

Hayes, Zachary, O.F.M. Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
Dr. Theol., Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany. 

Isabell, Damien, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of Spiritual Theology; 
S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian Uni- 
versity. Rome. 

Johnson, Basil, O.F.M. Instructor in Liturgies; A.B., Quincy Col- 
lege; B.Mus., De Paul University; M.A. in Liturgy, Catholic 
University, Washington; S.T.D. (Cand.), Institut Catholique 
de Paris. 

Joyce, Thomas. C.M.F. Assistant Professor of Church History; S.T.B., 
Catholic University of America, Washington; Graduate Study, 
Loyola of L.A. and Notre Dame University; L.H.E., Gregorian 
University. Rome; D.H.E., Gregorian University, Rome. 

Karris, Robert, O.F.M. Assistant Professor of New Testament Stud- 
ies; S.T.B., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.L., 
Catholic University of America, Washington; Th.D., Harvard 
Divinity School. 



14 



Knitter, Paul, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Doctrinal Theology; 
S.T.B., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.L., Gregorian Uni- 
versity, Rome; Doctoral Studies, Gregorian University, Rome 
and University of Muenster; Dr. Theol. Des., University of 
Marburg, Germany. 

Langerholz, Callistus, O.F.M. Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Studies; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; L.G., Pon- 
tifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome. 

MacDonald, Sebastian, CP. Professor of Ethics; S.T.L., University 
of St. Thomas, Rome; S.T.D., University of St. Thomas, Rome. 
Study, Princeton University. 

Mallonee, Robert W., S.V.D. Dean of Students and Lecturer in Pas- 
toral Care; M.A. Loyola University, Chicago; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College, River Forest, 111.; C.P.E. Training, Lutheran General 
Hospital, Chicago, and Wisconsin School for Boys; D.Min. 
(Cand.), Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Nemer, Lawrence, S.V.D. Associate Professor of Church History; 
L.Miss, Gregorian University, Rome; M.A. in History, Catho- 
lic University of America, Washington. (On leave for doctoral 
studies) . 

Newbold, Thomas More, CP. Professor of Pastoral Theology; 
Maitre-es-Sc-Med., L'Institut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 
Grand; Ph.D., University of Montreal, Canada. 

O'Malley, Kenneth, CP. Director of Library; A.M.L.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

Ostdiek, Gilbert, O.F.M. Academic Dean and Associate Professor 
of Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonia- 
num, Rome; S.T.D., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; Study, Har- 
vard Divinity School. 

Pawlikowski, John, O.S.M. Assistant Professor of Ethics; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Perelmuter, Hayim Goren. Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies; 
M.H.L., Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L. 
(Cand.), Hebrew Union College-Hebrew University; D.D., 
Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati. 



15 



Senior, Donald, CP. Assistant Professor of New Testament Studies; 
Baccalaureat en Theologie, University of Louvain; S.T.L., Uni- 
versity of Louvain; S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Spilly, Alphonse, C.PP.S. Instructor of New Testament Studies; 
M.A., University of Dayton; Ph.D. (Cand.), University of 
Chicago. 

Skerry, Donald, S.V.D. Assistant Professor of Preaching and Com- 
munications; S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; S.T.D., Gre- 
gorian University, Rome; M.A. (Cand.) in Speech, North- 
western University. 

Stuhlmueller, Carroll, CP. Professor of Old Testament Studies; 
S.T.L., The Catholic University of America, Washington; S.S.L., 
The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.S.D., The Pontifical 
Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. Benedict College. 

Vanasse, Roman, O.Praem. Director of MA. Program and Assistant 
Professor of Doctrinal Theology; S.T.L., Gregorian University, 
Rome; S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome; Study, Oriental 
Institute, University of Chicago, and Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome. 



ADJUNCT FACULTY 



Bush, Harold, Ph.B., University of Chicago; M.A., Roosevelt Uni- 
versity, Chicago; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology, Chi- 
cago; Visiting Professor of Psychology. 

Chiaramonte, Frank, CS.Sp. S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome; 
S.T.D., Gregorian University, Rome; M.Sc. (Psych), Chicago 
State University; Visiting Professor of Psychology. 

Loiskandl, Helmut M., S.V.D. Ph.D. DePaul University; Visiting 
Professor of Anthropology. 



16 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




DEAN OF STUDENTS 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 
WORSHIP 

FORMATION COUNCIL 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 



The Dean of Students is the official representative of the adminis- 
tration for matters of student life at Catholic Theological Union. 
He works closely with the Student Executive Committee and the 
Formation Council. He serves as liaison person between these bodies 
and the administration. The Dean of Students coordinates CTU 
ordinations and common liturgies. He has direct responsibility for 
personal and academic counseling and supervision of students-at- 
large. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The basic organ of student opinion and action at Catholic Theo- 
logical Union is the Student Government. Chartered by its constitu- 
tion, the Student Government coordinates several areas of student 
responsibility and participation in CTU life. The Student Govern- 
ment places representatives on the CTU Senate, and on the principal 
school committees: Admissions, Budget, Library, Curriculum, Rank 
and Recruitment. The Student Government is directed by the Stu- 
dent Executive Committee, headed by a president and vice-president 
elected by the student body. The several participating communities 
also place representatives on the SEC. The SEC represents the stu- 
dents in matters dealing with the faculty and administration, as 
well as student concerns in the Cluster. The SEC works closely 
with the Dean of Students. Mr. Richard Massaro, C.S.Sp. is presi- 
dent of the SEC for 1973-1974. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 

The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
Catholic priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of char- 
acter and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility 
must be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the de- 
mands of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility 
of the Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern 
for the administration and faculty of the school. This facet of the 
student's development is remanded to the directors of spiritual for- 
mation of the several participating communities. By means of public 
conferences, group discussion and individual guidance sessions, the 
theological student is assisted in formulating ideals of life and serv- 
ice that are essential to commitment in the priestly ministry. 



18 



The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depend- 
ent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 

A full-time staff member with professional training in counseling 
serves as auxiliary counselor and resource person. 



WORSHIP 



An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of the 
Christian message; he is president of a worshipping community. 
Worship in faith has ever been considered a necessary adjunct to 
the fruitful mastery of Christian theology. 

At Catholic Theological Union each participating community 
determines its own schedule of prayer and worship. A school chapel 
is available for the use of all communities. Once each week various 
faculty members offer Mass for those who wish to attend. In this 
way the student sees his professors in a sacramental context. An 
official liturgy for the entire faculty and student body is held each 
month. These liturgies are coordinated by the Dean of Students 
with the assistance of the Professor of Liturgy and a student com- 
mittee. Besides communal worship, students are expected to de- 
vote time each day to personal reflection and private prayer. 



FORMATION COUNCIL 



The Formation Council is made up of the directors of spiritual 
formation of all communities at Catholic Theological Union. It 
provides a forum through which the directors share insights and 
experiences regarding spiritual formation. Also, the Formation 
Council agrees upon common policies in matters which affect the 
religious well-being of the student body as a whole, and makes suit- 
able recommendations to the administration. To foster the spiritual 
development of the students, the Formation Council arranges for 
speakers, conferences and workshops. It meets every two weeks. 
Liaison with the faculty is effected by the attendance of members 
at faculty meetings. The Formation Council places two representa- 
tives on the CTU Senate. 



19 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSIONS 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



ADMISSIONS 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Pre-theological studies have been the object of extensive study 
and consultation in recent years. The National Conference of Cath- 
olic Bishops in the 1971 Program of Priestly Formation, #289-320, 
and the American Association of Theological Schools in its recent 
Statement on Preseminary Studies have outlined in broad, flexible 
guidelines the kinds of foundational understandings the entering 
student ought to have in areas such as man and his world, religion, 
and skills of thought, communication, and language. Catholic 
Theological Union concurs with these statements and has adapted 
its admission requirements and recommendations to their spirit. 
Those wishing further guidance may write to the Dean for a bro- 
chure on pre-theological studies. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants must have a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent 
from an approved college or university. Applicants are also required 
to meet the following course requirements: 

(1) 15 semester hours of philosophy which should include an 
adequate exposure to the major historical periods of philo- 
sophical thought. Other recommended areas of philosophy 
are epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy of man. 

(2) An introductory course in sociology. 

(3) Two courses in psychology. Experimental psychology and 
the psychology of personality are highly recommended. 

Applicants who have not fulfilled these course requirements may 
be admitted to CTU on probation and will be expected to complete 
them as soon as possible during their first year of residence. 

Those wishing further guidance in planning specific courses for 
entry into CTU can request the office of the Dean for recommenda- 
tions. 



22 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 



The general admission procedures are: 

(1) Request official application form from the CTU registrar 
and return completed form with matriculation fee to the 
registrar's office. All applications must be received by May 
15th. Applications will be accepted after this date, but there 
is no guarantee admission processing will be completed be- 
fore the beginning of the Fall Quarter. In such a case a 
student may be admitted conditionally at the discretion ot 
the Committee on Admissions. 

(2) Submit transcripts of all college credits to CTU registrar. 

(3) Have scores from Graduate Record Exam sent to CTU regis- 
trar. 

(4) Students applying for admission who do not belong to reli- 
gious congregations officially connected with CTU will also 
have to provide three letters of recommendation. If the per- 
son belongs to a diocese or religious congregation, one ot 
these letters must be written by an official representative ot 
the diocese or congregation. A personal interview with an 
admissions officer may be required of the prospective student. 

(5} CTU as such does not engage in psychological testing of its 
students. It considers such testing to be the competence of 
the respective religious congregations. Students not con- 
nected with official CTU religious congregations may be re- 
quired to furnish test results to the Dean of Students. C1U 
does not keep such files for other students. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



REGISTRATION FOR COURSES 



Registration takes place several weeks in advance of the quarter 
in which the courses are to be taken, as announced m the calendar. 
Late registration is allowed at the beginning of each quarter, on the 
days listed in the calendar. Any registration after those dates must 
be accompanied by a fee of $5.00. 



23 



Changes in registration are allowed through the first week of the 
quarter. After that the course must appear in the transcript with 
some grade (cf. below, "grading"). 

Ordinarily tuition is not refundable after the first week of the 
quarter. Exceptional circumstances may, however, lead to reimburse- 
ment of half the tuition for a course that is dropped before the 
mid-quarter. 

CLASS LOAD AND CLASS SCHEDULING 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, they meet 150 
minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week in every quarter 
is examination week. 



The normal class load is 4 courses (12 quarter hours). Special 
permission is required from the Dean to carry more than 12 hours. 
A full time student is one who carries at least three courses or the 
equivalent. 

Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday generally in the 
morning and afternoon. Some evening classes are offered. 

GRADING 

Both the letter grade system and the pass-fail system are used at 

CTU. Further details of these options are found in the faculty and 
student handbooks. 

A=Excellent P=Pass 

B=Good HP=High Pass 

C=Fair or Average WP=Withdrew, Passing 

D=Poor WF=Withdrew, Failing 

F=Fail PI=Permanent Incomplete 

WITHDRAWALS 

Students may withdraw from any course up to the end of the 
seventh week of the quarter. Approval of their advisor is required. 
They must follow the procedures established by the Registrar's Office. 



24 



INCOMPLETES 



The teacher may allow a student an extension of his course work 
for any given quarter up to the end of the fifth week of the next 
quarter. If the student does not finish his work by the end of the 
fifth week, the teacher will award him either an "F" (failure) or 
a "PI" (permanent incomplete, i.e. work no longer subject to com- 
pletion). No credit will be given for a permanently incompleted 
course. Such a course may be repeated provided that the student 
registers and pays tuition according to the normal procedures of 
the school. 



FAILURES 

No credit will be given for a course in which a student received 
an F. If it is a required course, the student must successfully com- 
plete that course before graduation. 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT 



No college course may be substituted for an upper division course 
at CTU. Graduate credits previously earned in theology may be 
transferred toward the Master of Divinity degree, provided that the 
student has earned at least a "C in those courses. These credits 
will be recognized only after the student successfully completes one 
year of academic work at CTU. 



CREDIT BY CROSS-REGISTRATION 

Graduate students enrolled at CTU may register for courses in 
any of the schools of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
(CCTS), in the Center for Studies in Religious Education (CSRE), 
and in the Chicago Center for Black Religious Studies (CCBRS) 
with the approval of their academic advisor and the Academic Dean. 
Additional tuition and registration fees are not charged by the 
other Cluster schools. 



Credit for courses taken in other Cluster schools, in the CSRE, 
and in the CCBRS can be applied toward both elective and area 
course requirements of the CTU degree programs. Up to one third 
of the course requirements may be taken in other schools of the 
Cluster and in special circumstances in the CCBRS. By special 
arrangement this may be increased to one half. 



25 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



THE CURRICULUM 



In keeping with the stated purpose and objectives of the Catholic 
Theological Union (see p. 7-8), the curriculum is intended to provide 
the necessary professional preparation for those who wish to enter 
ordained ministry in the Roman Catholic Church and an appropriate 
graduate theological preparation for those who are interested in a 
variety of Christian ministries. Curriculum objectives are specified in 
each of the school's programs. 

Accordingly, the basic curriculum at CTU is structured around the 
first professional degree of Master of Divinity (M.Div.). The 
school also offers the academic degree of Master of Arts in Theology 
(M.A.) to those students who wish to qualify for it. These degree 
programs are not mutually exclusive. A number of other program 
options are also available to CTU students. Candidates for the 
M.Div. can prepare themselves for specialized forms of ministry 
by incorporating into their program the areas of concentration co- 
operatively offered by CTU and the schools of the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools. (Cf. CCTS Announcements I9iy\9l4 r 
pages 8-18.) A cooperative program with DePaul University lead- 
ing to a Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.) can also be taken 
at CTU. The Program of Studies in the World Mission of the 
Church offers CTU students a number of program variations. Stud- 
ies in religious education are available in the Cluster schools and 
at the Center for Studies in Religious Education (CSRE) . 

The course-model is the basic approach used for the theological 
content dimension of the curriculum. However, individual teachers 
are free to experiment with a variety of pedagogical methods and 
the major portion of the required curriculum is by area rather than 
by specific course. 

CTU envisions its programs of preparation for ministry in two 
distinct phases: (l) the First Year Program; and (2) graduate 
professional preparation. 



26 



FIRST YEAR PROGRAM (FYP) 



Purpose and Goals 

The First Year Program is a blend of formal theological study 
and guided ministerial experience which orientates the beginning 
student toward the professional goal of CTU. While the program 
is structured to facilitate entrance into the M.Div. program, it is 
easily adaptable to the needs of those who will enter the M.A. 
Program. 

The FYP is under the direction of an inter-departmental team of 
professional preparation for ministry on the graduate level; to in- 
troduce the student to professional theological education and to 
guided experience in ministry in the context of today's world; to 
help the student understand the inner connection between theology, 
ministry, and world; to help the student understand that the quality 
of theology and ministry depends on his holiness and wholeness. 

The FYP is under the direction of an inter-departmental team of 
coordinators, who also work with the first year students as theologi- 
cal reflectors. Since its introduction in 1970 the FYP has under- 
gone continuing evaluation and modification to meet the needs of 
entering students. 



Structure and Content 

The theological dimension of the FYP includes course work in 
the areas of biblical, historical and systematic studies, which serves 
to introduce the student to the scriptures and to systematic theologi- 
cal reflection on the Christian heritage. The ministerial experience is 
provided by a pastoral work program which serves both as an intro- 
duction to ministry and as the experiential base for theological study. 
Proper integration of these components is promoted by such things 
as quarterly intensives and reflection on the pastoral work with 
staff and faculty members. Thus the basic issues of theology and 
ministry are reflected upon as complementary and inter-acting. 

During orientation the student and his academic adviser work 
out the optional course sequences of his program in view of his 
background and needs and the goals of the FYP. Six to eight 
students are grouped into a team for the pastoral work program. 
Each team is headed by a theological reflector. Team placement is 
made by the FYP coordinators after questionnaires and personal m- 



27 



terview. The student's program is then approved by the FYP co- 
ordinating team and the Dean. 

The full FYP consists of 36 quarter hours of work. Previous work 
may be accepted as equivalent to all or part of the FYP. 

The FYP Curriculum 
Fall Quarter: 

OLD TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION 
THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 
PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION 
INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY 
PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Winter Quarter: 

NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION 
THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE 
CHRISTIAN THEISM AND SECULAR HUMANISM 
THE ROLE OF EXPERIENCE IN MORAL THEOLOGY 
PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Spring Quarter: 

THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND INTERPRETATION 

CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 

INTRODUCTION TO SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY 

AREA STUDIES 

PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

Courses in biblical, classical, and modern languages, are also avail- 
able during various quarters of the year. 



MASTER OF DIVINITY (M.DIV.) PROGRAM 

Purpose and Goals 

The Master of Divinity is the first professional degree and the 
focus of CTU's academic program. The primary aim of the M.Div. 
Program is to prepare students to be effective ministers as described 



28 



in the CTU statement of purpose and objectives (see p. 7). Build- 
ing on the First Year Program, the standard M.Div. Program (de- 
scribed below) combines an academic core of theological studies 
with a theoretical and practical study of the professional skills 
needed by the Roman Catholic priest. Students who so desire can 
attain a certain amount of specialization within this program, espe- 
cially by combining it with a program of mission studies or with the 
Cluster areas of concentration. The area requirements of this pro- 
gram can also be tailored to meet the needs of students looking to 
other than priestly ministery. 

The curricular objectives of the M.Div. Program are specified in 
terms of three dimensions which CTU considers basic to a sound 
professional education for ministry. 

1. Theological Content. The student must achieve a thorough and 
critical understanding of the Christian heritage. He must develop 
the ability to interpret and apply it creatively within the context of 
present-day thought and culture. It has been the task of the several 
departments to single out those areas which the student should en- 
counter and for which he will be held responsible. These areas are 
outlined below. 

2. Ministerial Skills. The student must acquire a set of skills ap- 
propriate for his future ministry. This process includes a number of 
inter-locking phases in which the student masters theory and tech- 
niques, engages in actual ministerial experience in a developing way 
under the guidance of a supervisor, and assumes increasing respon- 
sibility for perfecting his own professional skills. The skills to be 
acquired include not only the traditional ones, such as preaching, pas- 
toral counseling, administration of the sacraments, appropriate litur- 
gical style, but also those called for in the relatively new possibili- 
ties for mission and ministry. 



3. Integrative Education. The third dimension of professional 
preparation for ministry at CTU is the difficult task of integration. 
The student is aided in this effort by such facets of the program as 
the interdisciplinary character of the FYP, the increasing number 
of team and inter-departmental courses, the comprehensive project 
or seminar required for the M.Div. degree, and especially the pro- 
gram of Field Education. 



29 



Field Education 

It is the task of Field Education to bring the student's growing 
mastery of theological content and acquisition of ministerial skills 
into focus and personal integration in the act of effective ministry. 
Theory and skills of themselves do little for the minister unless in 
their acquisition they are integrated in such a way that they become 
part of the process of human growth. This presumes that the great- 
est resource of the ministry is a well integrated or developed per- 
sonhood. 

The Director of Field Education at Catholic Theological Union 
is responsible for placing individual students in specific and ex- 
pertly supervised action programs. The Department of Christian 
Mission and Ministry is responsible for providing opportunities for 
theological reflection growing out of such programs. A variety of 
possibilities for field education exist in the local community (Hyde 
Park-Kenwood area) and the larger Chicago metropolis, e.g., 
parishes, chaplaincies in the hospitals, correctional institutions, jails; 
the inner-city apostolate; radio and television communications; cate- 
chetical and youth counseling programs; various social action pro- 
grams; campus ministry. 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity Program will be 
required to spend eighteen quarter hours or the equivalent of two 
quarters in supervised field education programs. Students are en- 
couraged to enroll in a Clinical Pastoral Education program for one 
of the quarters. 

The effectiveness of a program in field education is due in large 
measure to careful supervision. The following supervisors direct 
the on-site work of CTU students: 

Mrs. Gela Altaian 

Rev. Robert Behnen, O.F.M. 

Rev. Philip Clark 

Rev. Robert E. Ferrigan 

John Hill 

Rev. Francis J. Kane 
Rev. John Lynch 
Rev. John Mans 



30 



Pre-requisites 

Candidates for the Master of Divinity must meet the general ad- 
mission requirements of the Catholic Theological Union. They must 
also have completed the CTU First Year Program or its equivalent. 
The equivalency will be judged by the appropriate department or 
officer. 

First year students who plan to enter the M.Div. Program are 
required to take a total of 36 quarter hours chosen from the first 
year offerings. Of these, three courses (9 hours) are required in 
the Department of Biblical Literature and Languages: BLL 300, 
305, 315; three courses (9 hours) are required in the Department 
of Historical and Doctrinal Studies; and three quarters of the Pas- 
toral Work Program are required. Finally, six quarter hours of 
church history survey, which may be taken either in upper level 
college or in the FYP, are required for entrance into upper level 
courses in the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies. 

Once the pre-requisites have been met, the M.Div. Program will 
usually take three years (at least 8 quarters) . It must be completed 
within seven years. If there has been a prolonged interruption, the 
Dean may require a certain amount of residence as well. 



Language Requirements 

Language requirements are determined by each department for its 
course offerings. 

Course Requirements 

A total of 99 quarter hours of graduate level work are required 
for the Master of Divinity, in which the candidate must maintain 
a "C" (2.0) average. Three of these hours represent the compre- 
hensive requirement. The remaining hours are divided among the 
following required areas: 

A. Dept. of Biblical Literature & Languages (BLL) 
Area Requirements: 

1. Old Testament 

Three areas: 
Pentateuch or Deuteronomic Corpus 
Prophets 

Wisdom Literature or Psalms 



18 hrs. 
9 hrs. 



31 



2. New Testament 9 hrs. 

Three areas: 
Synoptics 
Johannine course 
Pauline course 

B. Dept. of Historical & Doctrinal Studies (HDS) 33 hrs. 

Area Requirements: 

1. History 3 hrs. 

Course in Modern or Contemporary History 

2. Systematics 30 hrs. 

a. Doctrinal areas 18 hrs. 



God* 

Creation & Eschatology 

Christ 

Church* 

Sacraments (two courses, one of which 
must be on Eucharist) 



b. Ethical areas 3 hrs. 

One course in foundational ethicsf 

Two courses in ethical issues 

c. Law 3 hrs. 

Theology of Law 

C. Dept. of Christian Mission & Ministry ( CMM ) 30 hrs. 

Area Requirements: 

1. Sacramental Law 3 hrs. 

2. Pastoral Counseling 3 hrs. 

3. Preaching 3 hrs. 

4. Pastoral Mission 3 hrs. 

5. Field Education 18 hrs. 

D. Electives 15 hrs. 

TOTAL 96 hrs. 



32 



Students who have taken the course on God* or Church* in the 
FYP may select another doctrinal area as part of the required gradu- 
ate hours. 

Students who have taken foundational ethicsf in the FYP may 
select another area in ethics as part of the required 9 graduate hours. 

Up to one third of the course requirements, including both area 
and elective requirements, may be taken in other schools of the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, and in special circumstances 
in the Chicago Center for Black Religious Studies. By special ar- 
rangement with the Dean this may be increased to one half. 



Comprehensive Requirement 

The candidate for the Master of Divinity degree must also give 
evidence of his ability to integrate his total educational experience 
into an operational totality. This is done in either of two ways. 



(1) A master's report or project demonstrating both integration 
of theological knowledge and a creative response to some 
particular problem of ministry. This is normally done under 
the guidance of a CTU faculty member. The project must 
be submitted to the appropriate department for approval. 



(2) The successful completion of an inter-departmental integrat- 
ing seminar. The objective of this seminar is not the impart- 
ing of new knowledge, but rather the integration of knowl- 
edge and skills already acquired and their application to 
concrete problems of ministry. The student is evaluated on 
his ability to apply the totality of his professional education 
to the areas treated in the seminar. The seminar (M.Div. 
598) is directed by an inter-departmental team and will be 
offered in the Spring Quarter. 

Each of the above is equivalent to three quarter hours and stu- 
dents will be charged the normal fee for one course. 



33 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) — CTU PROGRAM 

The purpose of the CTU Program for the Master of Arts in The- 
ology is multidimensional. The Program is designed, within the 
resources of CTU and the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, 
to provide the theological background for those who wish: to pre- 
pare for entrance into a doctoral program in theology; to teach re- 
ligion at a secondary or college level; to develop a basic competence 
in the area of theological studies though their principal specializa- 
tion lies elsewhere. 

The M.A. Program is marked by flexibility, allowing for a wide 
variety of individually tailored programs. When he applies for ad- 
mission to the Program, normally by the middle of the quarter pre- 
ceding admission, the candidate will choose the objectives (s) which 
best meet his needs. Before registering for M.A. course work he will 
meet with his M.A. Board to work out the details of a program de- 
signed to help him achieve the objective (s) he has chosen. The M.A. 
Board will meet with the student once each quarter to evaluate his 
progress and to make any modifications in the program which might 
be advisable. 

The M.A. in theology is not routinely granted en route to the 
M.Div. It is also open to those who wish to gain theological back- 
ground for work other than the priestly ministry. 

Once the pre-requisites have been met, the M.A. Program will 
usually take two years (one year of course work plus the time needed 
for the thesis and the comprehensive examinations) . It must be com- 
pleted within seven years. 

Pre-requisites 

Candidates for the M.A. in Theology must meet the general ad- 
mission requirements of Catholic Theological Union. They must 
also have completed one year (24 semester hours or 36 quarter 
hours) of university or seminary level theology. This latter require- 
ment can be fulfilled in the CTU First Year Program or by an under- 
graduate major in Theology or Religious Studies from an accredited 
college or university, provided that the faculty judges this to be 
equivalent. To enter graduate level courses in the Department of 
Biblical Literature and Languages the M.A. candidate must have 
taken BLL 300, 305, and 315 or their equivalent; to enter graduate 
courses in the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies he 



34 



must have completed at least twelve quarter hours of historical and 
doctrinal studies, including six quarter hours of church history survey. 



Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is required 
of all candidates for the M.A. degree. The choice will normally 
be limited to French or German. In addition, those specializing in 
HDS will normally be required to demonstrate a reading knowledge 
of Latin, and those specializing in BLL will be required to demon- 
strate a reading knowledge of Greek or Hebrew, or both, depending 
on the scope of the program. Language requirements shall normally 
be met by the end of the first quarter of the first year of the M.A. 
Program. 



Course Requirements 

Requirements include 36 quarter hours (12 courses) of course 
work, in which the candidate must maintain a "B" average. The 
course work shall be divided as follows: 

1 . Eight upper division courses in the student's area 
of specialization (BLL, HDS, or selected areas 
of CMM) of which two courses are advanced 
seminars 24 hours 

2. Two upper division courses in each of the other 

areas 12 hours 

Up to one third of the courses may be taken in other schools of 
the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, and in special circum- 
stances in the Chicago Center for Black Religious Studies. By special 
arrangement with the M.A. Board, this may be increased to one half. 

Thesis 

As part of the requirement for the M.A. in Theology, the candi- 
date must demonstrate the ability to do competent work in his field 
by writing a thesis characterized by research and independent 
thought. This thesis shall be seventy-five to one hundred pages in 
length and conform to one of the accepted manuals of style for 
this kind of work. The thesis is equivalent to nine quarter hours. 



35 



Comprehensive Examinations 



The final requirement for the M.A. in Theology is a two-part 
comprehensive examination in which the candidate is to demonstrate 
his grasp of theological methodologies used in theological disciplines 
and the scope and integration of his theological studies. The con- 
tent and approach for which he will be responsible in the compre- 
hensives is determined by the student and his Board of Examiners 
within the general prescriptions of the M.A. Program. 

Further details of the M.A. Program can be obtained from the 
Director, Fr. Roman Vanasse, O.Praem. 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) — COOPERATIVE PROGRAM AT DEPAUL 

A cooperative Master of Arts Program at Catholic Theological 
Union and DePaul University is also available to CTU students. 
The degree is granted by DePaul University. Requirements of the 
program include completion of forty-eight quarter hours of graduate 
study (of which up to eight may be applied to the thesis), a com- 
prehensive examination, and a one-hour "defense of thesis." Further 
details of the program can be obtained from the Dean's office. 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES IN THE 
WORLD MISSION OF THE CHURCH 

The World Mission of the Church is at the threshold of a new 
era. The growing thrust toward unity on the economic and political 
planes, the deeper realization of cultural pluralism within that unity, 
and the greater involvement in the struggle for human dignity have 
all given new thrust and direction to the Church's mission in the 
world: to be truly servant to mankind, to be truly indigenous and 
catholic, to be truly a sign and instrument of man's unity with man 
and union with God. 

It is in this context that the Program of Studies in World Mission 
has developed at CTU. The goal is to prepare a man of dialogue 
— one who lives a precarious existence between different cultural 
worlds; who tries to serve rather than to give, to assist rather than 
to prescribe; who wants to enable other churches and other religions 



36 



to develop according to their best tendencies, and is confident that 
such development will involve greater faithfulness to the God of 
grace. 



CTU students who wish to focus their preparation for ministry on 
the world mission of the church have various program options. Basic 
to such a program is a concentrated quarter in Cross-Cultural Com- 
munication of the Gospel offered cooperatively by CTU and the 
schools of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. This quarter, 
as a total environment experience, gives the student an introduction 
into the complexities of cultural pluralism and unity in today's world 
and the challenge of communicating the Gospel in this context. 
(For further details of this quarter, see the CCTS Announcements 
1973-1974, pp. 16-18.) 



The themes and experiences of this quarter are then further de- 
veloped and deepened through a wide range of courses, seminars 
and field experiences which can lead to either of two CTU degrees: 

Master of Arts in Theology with Mission Specialization; 
Master of Divinity with Mission Specialization. 

These degree programs are tailored to meet the student's needs 
under the guidance of faculty advisors. 



The Program of Studies in World Mission is carried out in co- 
operation with the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools which 
guarantees a broad theological and ecumenical environment. In- 
cluded in this dimension is the participation in planning and spon- 
soring of various workshops and meetings on current mission and 
international problems as well as the annual one-week Institute 
for Missionaries. 



In addition to the annual Institute, missionaries on leave are wel- 
comed and encouraged to participate more fully in the Program 
through courses as part of a continuing education program. So far 
missionaries from Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Indonesia, South Africa and 
South West Africa have done so. 



37 



CENTER FOR STUDIES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

The Center is an educational organization which offers both 
courses and clinical programs in the area of religious education, 
under the direction of Fr. Eugene Mainelli, O.P., and Fr. Paul 
Wierenga, O.P. (Cf . CCTS Announcements 1973-1974, pages 48-49.) 

CTU students wishing to include religious education in their 
preparation for ministry are encouraged to register for work at 
the Center. 



AUXILIARY STUDY PROGRAMS 

Credit may be given for study-travel programs abroad and other 
auxiliary programs, provided that they have been approved by the 
faculty. 

During the summer of 1973, CTU students participated in an 
overseas study program in Italy conducted by Fr. D. Isabell, O.F.M., 
S.T.D. This study-travel seminar consisted of an on-site study of 
church life, Franciscan spirituality and its sources. 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

Catholic Theological Union is a charter member of the Chicago 
Cluster of Theological Schools, an ecumenical association of eight 
Protestant and Catholic seminaries whose purpose is to promote 
quality theological education through a programed sharing of re- 
sources. 

After a period of informal cooperation which began in 1969, the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools was formed in May, 1970. 
The Cluster was incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois 
on April 26, 1971. Five of the Cluster schools are located in Hyde 
Park: Bellarmine School of Theology, Catholic Theological Union, 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology, and 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School. Three schools are in the 
western suburbs: Bethany and Northern Baptist in Oak Brook, and 
DeAndreis in Lemont. 



38 



The participating schools maintain educational autonomy and con- 
tinue to offer their own degrees, both professional and academic. 
Each school also preserves its confessional identity and theological 
traditions. CTU participation in the Cluster follows the guidelines 
set down by the Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity in the 
Ecumenical Directory, Part II, and by the National Conference of 
Catholic Bishops in the Program of Priestly Formation, #253-288. 
Graduate students at CTU may register in courses offered in the 
Cluster with the approval of their academic advisor and the Aca- 
demic Dean. 

The Cluster is directed by a full-time coordinator, with staff as- 
sistants for academics and library. 

The Cluster enriches the theological potential of the member 
schools in many ways: 

1) A student enrolled in any Cluster school may take courses in 
any other Cluster school without additional tuition or regis- 
tration fees. During the 1972-73 school year, students cross- 
registered for over 450 courses. 

2) The Cluster sponsors courses team-taught by professors of 
two or more schools. (Cf. CCTS Announcements 1973-1974, 
pages 19-21.) 

3) Reciprocal library privileges and services to all Cluster stu- 
dents and faculty. 

4) Joint planning in purchasing, use of educational facilities, 
faculty replacement. 

Two signal advances in the life of the Cluster will mark the 1973- 
1974 school year. In order to facilitate cross-registration and to 
increase access to outstanding teachers and courses, select seminars 
are being offered on Thursdays at a common location. (For details, 
see the CCTS Announcements 1973-1974, pages 22-25.) 

After eighteen months of planning and consultation within the 
Cluster, four unique cooperative programs of preparation for min- 
istry have been readied for the 1973-1974 school year. These pro- 
grams will provide the student with four areas of concentration in 
which he can bring his preparation into focus around broad types 



39 



of ministerial function: personal transformation, social transforma- 
tion, celebration, and cross-cultural communication. Each program 
of concentration comprises three educational elements: theological 
input, field placement, and an integrative structure, and each is 
conducted by an inter-disciplinary, inter-school staff. The programs 
are open only to upper division students. CTU students may in- 
corporate these programs into their Master of Divinity program. 
(Full details of these programs can be found in the CCTS Announce- 
ments 1973-1974, pages 8-18.) 

The Chicago Cluster is a prime example of ecumenical under- 
standing and cooperation. A large area of theological studies is of 
common interest and is confessionally not sensitive. In many courses, 
professors of all denominations use the same basic sources and 
methodology. In addition, there are questions of current interest to 
all confessions, and the contributions of modern theologians often 
cut across confessional lines. Cluster experience has shown that stu- 
dents become more appreciative of their own confessional identity 
and professors do not proselytize in any way. 



40 



COURSES OF STUDY 




BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 
CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 



COURSES OF STUDY 



Courses offered during the academic year 1973-74 are listed below. 
Three departments make up the school of theology of the Catholic 
Theological Union: The Department of Biblical Literature and Lan- 
guages; the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies; and 
the Department of Christian Mission and Ministry. The courses are 
divided into three series: "300" series (courses preparatory to grad- 
uate work at either the M.A. or M.Div. level); "400" series (grad- 
uate level courses representing generally the core courses for the 
M.Div. degree); "500" series (graduate level seminars developing 
special questions in biblical, traditional and contemporary theology). 

All courses are three quarter-hour courses, that is, classes are 
scheduled 150 minutes per week for ten weeks. The eleventh week 
is evaluation week. 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
(BLL) 

Staff: Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Robert Karris, Callistus Langerholz, 
Hayim G. Perelmuter, Donald Senior, Alphonse Spilly, Carroll Stuhl- 
mueller. 

BLL 300: OLD TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old 
Testament will be studied against the background of Israel's history, 
religion and literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a con- 
trolled knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation for future in- 
depth study of individual sections. Yearly. ^Fdl) 

BLL 305: NEW TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 
The writings of the New Testament will be presented in their historical, 
cultural, religious and sociological context in the Greco-Roman world. 
Introduction to the methodological tools employed in New Testament 
research and to the diverse theologies that comprise the New Testament 

witness to Jesus of Nazareth. Yearly. ^ RRI x 
J (Winter) 



42 



BLL 315: THE BIBLE: ITS FORMATION AND 
INTERPRETATION 



The formation of the Bible in terms of the "word" and its revelation 
of God's presence as Savior within the community of faith. The emer- 
gence of a sacred tradition of holy writ, interpreted anew by and for 
each generation. Topics of special study include: biblical inspiration 
and inerrancy; revelation, scripture and tradition; liturgy and the scrip- 
tures; the senses of scripture; Canon; texts and versions; textual criti- 
cism. Yearly. FOURNELLE and SENIOR 

(Spring) 

BLL 320: BIBLICAL GREEK 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who have little 
or no knowledge of Biblical Greek. Yearly. SENIOR 

(Fall) 

BLL 325: INTRODUCTORY HEBREW 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied 
Hebrew. Yearly. FOURNELLE 

(Winter) 

N.B. Advanced courses in the biblical languages will be offered by the 
department according to the needs of the students. 

BLL 400: HISTORICAL EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central to the understanding of the O.T. 

FOURNELLE 
(Fall) 

BLL 405: THE DEUTERONOMIC HISTORY 

Deuteronomy and the deuteronomic history. From the "conquest" to 
the end of the kingdoms, stressing the deuteronomic theology of history 
in the major events of the period. SPILLY 

(Winter) 

BLL 410: PRE-EXILIC PROPHECY 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" Prophets in the unique genius 
of Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of 
key passages in Amos, Hosea, and particularly Jeremiah, to appreciate 
their particular reaction to the religious contribution to the prophetic 
movement. 1974-1975. STUHLMUELLER 



43 



BLL 415: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 
EXILE AND POST-EXILIC PERIODS 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. The study will 
be undertaken by means of key texts within the prophets. 

STUHLMUELLER 
(Winter) 

BLL 420: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
other ancient Near Eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms 
as representative of major religious movements in Israel. 

STUHLMUELLER 
(Spring) 

BLL 425: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 

The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 
the "wise men." Retribution considered as thematic to study. 

FOURNELLE 
(Spring) 

BLL 430: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW 

Within the structure and the purpose of the Gospel, Matthew will be 
studied as a Pastor in his community in applying Jesus' teaching to his 
own situation. LANGERHOLZ 

(Spring) 

BLL 432: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK 

Introduction to Gospel form and redaction criticism. Exegesis of the 
Gospel. Mark's place in the theology of the primitive community. 
1974-1975. SENIOR 

BLL 435: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE 

Introduction to form and redaction criticism. Exegesis of the entire gos- 
pel with special reference to the most recent and the most significant 
redaction critical studies. Luke's place in the theologies of the Early 
Church. KARRIS 

BLL 440: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN 

A critical-exegetical approach to John's text to arrive at his sources and 
to evaluate his theology, particularly on the mission of the Son and 
the Church. Yearly. LANGERHOLZ 

(Fall) 



44 



BLL 450: PAULINE THEOLOGY 



Origin and development of main Pauline themes in the light of Paul's 
experience as well as the theological and cultural traditions and theo- 
logical disputes of his time. Implications for ministry. SPILLY 

(Spring) 

BLL 455: PAULINE EXEGESIS 

Methodology used in the exegesis of a Pauline epistle. Paul's theological 
and cultural milieu. Detailed exegesis of the entire epistle. The epistles 
treated differ from year to year. Offered 1973-1974: Romans. 

KARRIS/LINSS 
(Winter) 

BLL 458: EPISTLE TO THE HEBREWS 

Exegesis of the epistle in terms of its literary structure and Christology. 
The relationship between Christology and paraenesis will be explored. 
The key Christologicai passages will be highlighted. KARRIS 

(Spring) 

BLL 460: THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES 

The distinctive theology of this second part of Luke-Acts will be in- 
vestigated by the study of the methods of historical writing in antiquity, 
by the study of the speeches, and by the exegesis of other key passages. 
The question of using Acts as a source for the life and theology of Paul 
will also be discussed. 1974-1975. KARRIS 



BLL 500: SEMITIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE 

Directed research and class discussion, centering on such elements of 
Israelite daily life as: Hebrew language and psychology; social life of 
the people; commerce and industry; labor and sports; natural topog- 
raphy; climate and rainfall; etc. Extended lectures on the Hebrew lan- 
guage are directed towards those students who do not intend a formal 
study of the language. STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 502: PROBLEM OF AN O.T. THEOLOGY 

The question to be discussed is the possibility of a "theology" of the 
O.T. as differentiated from a "history of religious thought" in the O.T. 
Views of Burrows, Eichrodt, von Rad, de Vaux, Vriezen, Wright, etc., 
to be considered. 1974-1975. FOURNELLE 



45 



BLL 507: OLD TESTAMENT CREATION TEXTS 



The texts will be studied in their historical context as also in the con- 
text of the developing creation theology of the O.T. N.B. A knowledge 
of Hebrew is a pre-requisite for the course. STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 510: OLD TESTAMENT SACRIFICE 

This seminar will attempt to investigate the origins of Israelite sacrifice, 
its relation to sacrifices of the other peoples, and to arrive at some 
theory of O.T sacrifice. In particular the zebah selamim will be studied. 
3 FOURNELLE 

(Winter) 

BLL 518: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 

Historico-cultural-religious developments of the period. Jewish apocalyp- 
tic and its influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implications 
for New Testament study. Study of selected themes. 1974-1975. 

FOURNELLE 



BLL 520: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: I 

The tri-partite course on the Liturgy of the Synagogue— over a two year 
period— surveys worship forms in the contemporary American Syna- 
gogue with special reference to the common thread and variations in 
the Jewish denominations: Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. This 
first section deals with the weakly synagogue service. PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 521: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: II 

The Liturgy of the High Holy Days: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur. 
(Text: Agnon, Days of Awe [Shocken]). 1974-1975. PERELMUTER 

BLL 522: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE: III 

Liturgy of the Sabbath, etc. PERELMUTER 
67 (Fall) 

BLL 524: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE 

Texts to be selected. PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 526: RABBINIC JUDAISM AND THE EARLY CHURCH 

An examination of the nature of Rabbinic Judaism out of which Chris- 
tianity emerged and with which Christianity co-existed over the cen- 

46 



turies. An effort at achieving an insight into the approach and the mind 
of Rabbinic Judaism through an examination of the pertinent literature. 

PERELMUTER 
(Fall) 

BLL 530: QUMRAN: RELEVANCE FOR THE NEW TESTAMENT 

An introduction to the literature of Qumran and related discoveries, 
their relation to Palestinian Judaism of the time, and their relevance 
for new Testament studies. SPILLY 

(Fall) 

BLL 532: FAITH AND SUFFERING: THE GOSPEL ACCOUNTS 
OF THE DEATH OF JESUS 

This seminar will examine the four gospel accounts of the death of 
Jesus, seeking to appreciate how each gospel community was able to 
reflect on the death of Jesus in the light of its traditions and faith ex- 
perience. Participants in the seminar will be invited to use the skills of 
form and redaction criticism to analyze the gospel texts, and to evaluate 
their potential for contemporary proclamation. For full participation 
in the seminar at least a rudimentary knowledge of biblical Greek is 
desirable. SENIOR 

(Spring) 

BLL 533: THE MEANING OF DISCIPLESHIP IN THE GOSPEL 
TRADITION 

The seminar will focus on those pertinent gospel passages which deal 
with: a) the call to discipleship; b) the mission of the disciples; c) 
the demands of discipleship. The individual passages and themes will be 
studied in the light of the diverse theologies of the evangelists. SENIOR 

(Fall) 

BLL 570: THE PHENOMENON OF EARLY CATHOLICISM IN 
THE NEW TESTAMENT 

I and II Peter, James, the Pastorals, Luke- Acts will be investigated from 
the viewpoint of what Ernst Kasemann and others call "Early Catholi- 
cism." The theological tendencies of these New Testament books will 
be analyzed to see whether or to what extent they are "Early Catholic," 
i.e., stress moralization of the faith, hierarchical organization, fides quae 
creditur, etc. The problem of theological diversity in the New Testa- 
ment. 1974-1975. KARRIS 

BLL 597: INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Content and structure by arrangement. 

BLL 599: M.A. SEMINAR 



47 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
(HDS) 



Staff: Eugene Ahner, Dismas Bonner, Zachary Hayes (Chairman), 
Damien Isabell, Basil Johnson, Thomas Joyce, Paul Knitter, Se- 
bastian MacDonald, Lawrence Nemer (on leave), Gilbert Ost- 
diek, John Pawlikowski, Roman Vanasse. 

HDS 302: THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 

A study of the Church in its encounter with new cultures and an analy- 
sis of the effects the culture had on the Church (institutions, theology, 
and religious life) and the Church had on Society. Major considerations 
will be: The Jewish Community becoming Greek (early theology and 
heresies), becoming Roman (Church-State issues and institutional de- 
velopment), and becoming Byzantine (Caesaropapism and the Christo- 
logical debates) while at the same time elsewhere becoming something 
new (Barbarian invasions and the Papacy). Yearly. JOYCE 



HDS 307: THE CHRISTIANS ATI ON OF EUROPE 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Barbarian nations, of their 
conversion, and of the development of Christian life. An analysis of 
how the task affected Church life and thought, and of how the Church 
affected the world. Major consideration will be given to: Medieval 
Missions; Charlemagne; the Papal States; the Schism between East and 
West; and the development and experience of a Christian European 
Culture (theology, philosophy, social and political structures). Yearly. 

JOYCE 
(Winter) 



HDS 310: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renais- 
sance thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. Yearly. JOYCE 

(Spring) 



HDS 320: PHENOMENOLOGY OF RELIGION 

The course will first attempt to isolate some of the elements common 
to all religions, and their relationship to social structures. From this 
perspective, the phenomenon of civil religion will be examined, espe- 
cially as it is manifested in recent and contemporary attitudes in Ameri- 
can politics and diplomacy. Yearly. VANASSE 



48 



HDS 325: INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and methods of theology worked 
out from a study of several case-histories. Special emphasis on the his- 
torical revelation in Christianity and the developing awareness of the 
faith-community in relation to shifting horizons. Yearly. HAYES 

(Fall) 

HDS 330: CHRISTIAN THEISM AND SECULAR HUMANISM 

The localization of why Christian theistic faith has become problematic 
in our culture. The meaning of Christian theistic faith in biblical and 
Christian history and why it is a response to the contemporary prob- 
lematic about the meaning of human life. Yearly. HAYES 

(Winter) 

HDS 345: THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom 
to the Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; 
the development of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church 
to the world. Yearly. AHNER 

(Spring) 

HDS 371: THE ROLE OF EXPERIENCE IN MORAL THEOLOGY 

This is primarily a lecture-style course, intended as a general introduction 
to moral theology. It centers upon the meaning arid the role of human 
experience in the discipline of moral theology. The relationship of 
experience to such fundamental concerns as principles, law, conscience 
and freedom will be explored. The work of John Dewey will be 
stressed, and the student will be expected to cope with his own experi- 
ence in meeting course requirements. MACDONALD 

(Winter) 

HDS 390: INTRODUCTION TO SPIRITUAL THEOLOGY 

Concentrating on the experiential aspects of Christian revelation, the 
course will analyze the inner source of Christian life "in Christ," its 
psychological implications, the meaning of sin in realizing the Chris- 
tian project, and the reality of progress, religious experience to faith 
experience, way of prayer, night of the senses and of the spirit, and the 
social dimensions of spiritual growth. Special emphasis on the antino- 
mies of religious living. Yearly. ISABELL 

(Spring) 

HDS 397: AREA STUDIES 
Selected topics; by arrangement. 



STAFF 
(Spring) 



49 



HDS 416: EUROPEAN REVOLUTION AND CATHOLIC 
REACTION, 1770-1870 

An investigation of the background and course of the revolutions of the 
late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as they affected the Catholic 
Church. Special attention will be given to the reaction of Catholics, 
both traditionalists and progressives, to the sweeping changes occuring 
between the French Revolution and the First Vatican Council, (bst: 
divn 425) MADDEN 

(Fall) 

HDS 417: FROM NEWMAN TO VATICAN II 

This course will trace the main ideas and events of Roman Catholicism 
from 1845 to 1965. Special emphasis will be given to the personality 
and theology of John Henry Newman and a comparison and contrast of 
Vatican I and Vatican II. (bst: divn 422) ROSS 

(Winter) 

HDS 418: THE REVOLUTION AND PONTIFICATE OF 
JOHN XXIII 

The purpose of this course is to understand the innovative pontificate of 
John XXIII in the light of the other twentieth century popes. The lec- 
tures will cover the main policies of leading catholic churchmen regard- 
ing the issues of the times. These will be evaluated against the back- 
ground of the aggiomamento. (bst: divn 423) ROSS 

(Spring) 

HDS 420: CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE 19TH CENTURY 
UNITED STATES 

A study through research, lectures, and discussions of the major trends 
and problems which shaped the American Catholic Church. Special 
emphasis will be placed on "Americanism." (bst: divn 552) 

MADDEN 
(Winter) 

HDS 421: THE CHURCH AND THE AMERICAN CITY 

An historical and sociological study of the growth of the American 
Catholic Church in the American city from 1840. The growth of Chi- 
cago from an industrial city to a metropolitan area and its impact on 
the Church will serve as a model for the analysis. JOYCE 

(Winter) 

HDS 430: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. Yearly. HAYES 

(Fall) 



50 



HDS 431: EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE OF GOD IN THE 

NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS 
This course seeks to lay the groundwork for a "theology of the reli- 
gions." As Christians can — or must — we acknowledge that man can 
experience and salvifically encounter God in other religions? After a 
phenomenological overview (a la Eliade and Otto), contrasting Prot- 
estant and Catholic theological attitudes will be studied and evaluated 
(especially those of K. Karth, P. Althaus, P. Tillich, J. Danielou, K. 
Rahner, H. R. Schlette). KNITTER 

(Fall) 

HDS 435: ORIGINS AND ESCHATOLOGY 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the origins of man, the 
world and evil; a correlative investigation of finality and eschatological 
symbolism. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

KNITTER (Sec. 2) 
(Spring) 

HDS 440: CHRISTOLOGY 

An investigation of the structure and meaning of the Christian under- 
standing of salvation with particular emphasis on the problem of Chris- 
tian origins. Yearly. HAYES (Sec. 1) 

KNITTER (Sec. 2) 
(Winter) 

HDS 445: THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH • 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation of the Kingdom to 
the Church; the basic images and themes in Scripture and tradition; the 
development of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the Church to the 
world. Yearly. AHNER 

(Fall) 

HDS 446: THE MISSIONARY DYNAMICS OF THE CHURCH 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of "the missions," this 
course will try to determine why the Church by her very nature must 
be missionary, what this mission means, how "necessary" it is in the 
plan of salvation, and how it is to be carried out in our modern, post- 
colonial world. KNITTER 

(Winter) 

HDS 447: CHURCH AND STRUCTURE: THEOLOGY OF LAW 

A study of ecclesiological thought and attempts to concretize the theory, 
particularly in legal structures. The course involves historical survey, 
as well as examination of the contemporary tensions between theory 
and structure. Treats theory and practical problems of interpretation of 
law in the contemporary Church. Yearly. BONNER (Fall) 

BONNER (Winter) 



51 



HDS 450: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 



A study of the scriptural origins and historical development of the 
eucharistic liturgy, with particular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of eucharist in light of the above 
and of contemporary discussion. Consideration of current questions, 
e.g., ecumenical questions of intercommunion and eucharistic ministry. 
Yearly. OSTDIEK (Fall) 

JOHNSON (Winter) 

HDS 455: SACRAMENTS OF INITIATION 

General sacramental theology and the problem of contemporary symbols. 
Christian initiation, its institutional process and theology. The disin- 
tegration of the initiation structural process and the resultant Western 
theology of baptism and confirmation. The problem of infant baptism, 
physical sacramentalism and the response of faith. Yearly. OSTDIEK 

(Winter) 

HDS 460: SACRAMENTS OF HEALING AND VOCATION 

The origins and historical development of penance, anointing, marriage, 
ordination. Questions of contemporary theological significance and cele- 
bration of these sacraments. Yearly. OSTDIEK and JOHNSON 

(Spring) 

HDS 465: INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN-JEWISH 
DIALOGUE 

An examination o fthe modern theological developments in the area of 
Christian-Jewish Relations. Central issues will be the understanding of 
Christ and the problem of history. Examination of biblical materials 
relating to basic issues in the dialogue as well as the historical relation- 
ship between the two faith-communities. Principles for Christianity's 
relationship to non-Christian religons that emerge from the dialogue. 
Readings will be geared to special interests and background of the 
students. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Winter) 

HDS 471: THE FUNCTION OF PERSPECTIVES IN 
MORAL ISSUES 

The approaches and outlooks that initiate moral inquiry are the subject 
of consideration in this course. "Perspectives" is the term best suited 
to identify this process; it corresponds in large measure with the func- 
tion of first principles in moral theory. The connection of "conscious- 
ness-raising" processes with perspectives will be studied, together with 
a survey of some current dominant perspectives controlling attempted 
solutions of moral issues in this country. MACDONALD 

(Fall) 



52 



HDS 475: THEOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL ETHICS 

This course will attempt to establish the basis for the Christian commit- 
ment to social ethics. Some consideration will be given to biblical and 
doctrinal problems that have frequently lessened this commitment in the 
past. Readings will be from the works of Reinhold Niebuhr, Johannes 
Mete, H.R. Niebuhr, Rosemary Reuther and others. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Winter) 

HDS 482: MORAL DILEMMAS ABOUT HUMAN LIFE 

The subject of this seminar is the growing national discussion on the 
many areas touching the quality of human life. This includes both 
the traditional area of medical-moral issues, and also emerging ques- 
tions in the area of bio-ethics, where social and political considerations 
are of concern. The emphasis will be on the pastoral dimensions of 
these dilemmas, and the seminar requirements will be pastoral in nature. 
Yearly. MACDONALD 

(Fall) 

HDS 492: DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY III 

An historical study of personal response to God and how men and 
women have organized their lives around their God-experience. This 
cycle will study the penitential movements, the Carolingian Reform and 
its effect on spiritual experience, the spirituality of "pilgrimages," St. 
Bernard, the Franciscan Movement (Francis, Bonaventure), Dominicans, 
the Mystical Movements of the XIII (Angela of Foligno, Hadewijch, 
Dante) and of the XIV century (Eckhart, Tauler, Ruysbroeck). 

ISABELL 
(Fall) 

HDS 515: ART OF CHRISTIAN CELEBRATION 

A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of ritual development. 
Analysis of the constitutive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, 
gesture, music, dance) and their relationship to the ministerial role in 
celebration. A consideration of certain problems and developments in 
liturgical experimentation. Yearly. JOHNSON 

(Spring) 

HDS 517: LITURGICAL SOURCES 

A theological-historical study of selected cultic sources of the Western 
Church. These sources are investigated for a deeper understanding of 
the process whereby ritual develops. (Some knowledge of Latin re- 
quired.) JOHNSON 

(Winter) 



53 



HDS 520: THEOLOGY OF KARL RAHNER 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner and its implications 

T T A VCP 

in his theological writings. rlAiHo 

(Spring) 

HDS 531: THE THEOLOGY OF WOLFHART PANNENBERG 

A seminar-structured reading and discussion of selected works of Pan- 
nenberg in an attempt to determine and evaluate the key elements of his 
theology, their relevance for modern man, and their significance for 
ecumenical dialogue. KNITTER 
& (Fall) 

HDS 546: DIALOGUE WITH PROTESTANT VIEWS OF 
CHURCH 

This seminar course attempts to build dialogue on a sounder and more 
personal knowledge of various Protestant approaches to the nature and 
role of the Church. Dialogue will be carried out against the back- 
ground of New Testament teaching; intent is to balance off "extremes" 
in both Protestant and Catholic ecclesiology. Particular attention will 
be given to the Church-views of Barth, E. Brunner, Tillich, Bonhoeffer, 
J. Robinson, Moltmann, Pannenberg. KNITTER 

(Spring) 

HDS 570: THEOLOGY OF REVOLUTION 

In order to provide a realistic context in which to theologize about 
revolution, the course will begin with an introduction to concrete revo- 
lutionary situations past and present. These will be interpreted through 
readings from Craine Brinton, Hannah Arendt, and Frantz Fanon. 
Through the use of required readings and tapes the scene will then shift 
to the theological-ethical sphere as various attempts to construct a 
theology of revolution by contemporary Christian authors are examined 
in some depth. There will be a particular focus on the writings of 
Latin American theologians such as Reuben Alves, but the models put 
forward by American such as Charles West and John Swomley will also 
have a hearing. The final class sessions will involve a discussion of 
contractive statements on a theology of revolution prepared by each 
member of the seminar. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Fall) 

HDS 580: THE ETHICS OF CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 

This course will attempt to sharpen awareness of the alertness to the 
state of Christian marriage in American society, with emphasis on the 
problems confronting it. Off this base a moral analysis will be made. It 
will stress the kind of adjustment(s) demanded by these problems 
within the perspective of marriage handed on to us by tradition. Yearly. 

MACDONALD 
(Winter) 



54 



HDS 584: MORAL ISSUES IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



The meaning of justice is of concern here, in the conspicuously Ameri- 
can sphere of business and economics. This seminar will include both 
practical cases studied by business ethics, as well as more far-reaching 
social issues associated with the economy, including international aspects 
affected by private enterprise. MACDONALD and PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Spring) 

HDS 586: PRAGMATISM AND MORAL THEOLOGY 

The American tradition on pragmatism (Dewey, Peirce, James) will 
be explored and applied to the discipline of moral theology. A com- 
parison will be established with Catholic moral theory, especially in 
terms of a morality based on consequences. A critique of the meaning 
of action, including scientific method and technology, will conclude this 
study. MACDONALD 

(Spring) 

HDS 597: INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Content and structure by arrangement. 

HDS 599: M.A. SEMINAR 

Open to M.A. candidates only. The content of the seminar may vary 
according to the needs of the candidates, but some emphasis will usual- 
ly be placed on exposure to and use of various theological methodologies, 
phenomenological, historical, transcendental, etc. Yearly VANASSE 

(Spring) 

HDS 416, 417, 418, 420 given at Bellarmine school of Theology. 



C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN MISSION AND MINISTRY 
(CMM). 

Staff: John Boberg (Chairman), Dismas Bonner, Lois Dideon, Dennis 
Geaney, D ami en Isabell, Robert Mallonee, Thomas More Newbold, 
Donald Skerry. 

CMM 380-385-390: PASTORAL WORK PROGRAM 

The pastoral work program provides guided exposure to the social and 
ecclesiastical scene in Chicago through direct experience of select min- 
isterial activity. Reflection on this experience is correlated with course 
work being taken. Six to eight students are grouped into a team headed 
by a theological reflector. STAFF 

(Fall, Winter, Spring) 



55 



CMM 400: THE SOURCES OF PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An historical survey of contemporary psychotherapy, with emphasis on 
Freud, Tune and the trend toward existential synthesis in psychotherapy. 
Yearly NEWBOLD 

(Winter) 

CMM 405: BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL COUNSELING 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counseling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practices. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. Yearly. MALLONEE (Fall) 

NEWBOLD (Winter) 

CMM 406: PRACTICUM IN BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL 
COUNSELING 

A prerequisite for this offering is CMM 405, or equivalent. The course 
is a practicum; with emphasis in the practicum on reality practice role- 
play, relative to specific types of pastoral counseling situations. Follow- 
up is offered in the form of evaluation sessions. Verbatim reports will 
also be required, and evaluation will be given in both individual and 
group sessions. Yearly. NEWBOLD 

(Spring) 

CMM 410: GUIDANCE AND SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

An examination of the relationship between techniques from the fields 
of guidance and counseling and the minister's role as spiritual director. 
Yearly ISABELL 

(Fall) 

CMM 420: LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE SACRAMENTS 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, conciliar norms and cur- 
rent practical application of legislation regarding the administration and 
reception of the sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law 
and practice. Yearly. BONNER 

(Spring) 

CMM 450: PRACTICUM IN PREACHING 

A workshop style criticism of written and delivered sermons. Individual 
criticism and practice using video-tape equipment. Yearly. SKERRY 

(Winter and Spring) 

CMM 455: SERMON DESIGN: METHODS AND THEORY 

Study and practice in the basic elements of sermon production: creative- 
ness in sermon preparation; determining the theme; organization; style; 
delivery; and judging results. Yearly. SKERRY 



56 



CMM 480-485-490: FIELD EDUCATION PROJECT: I, II, and III 



GEANEY 
(Year long) 



CMM 486: PASTORAL TEACHER EDUCATION (PTE) 
CMM 495: CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION (CPE) 
CMM 497: PASTORAL INTERNSHIP (PI) 

CMM 495, 96 & 97: By arrangement with Director of Field Education. 

CMM 505: ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN PASTORAL 
COUNSELING 

Prerequisite is CMM 405, or equivalent. The practicum requires en- 
rollment for all three quarters. It consists of live counseling of high 
school students, with on-going supervision on a weekly basis. 

CHIARAMONTE and BUSH 
(All quarters) 



CMM 508: EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PASTORAL 
PRACTICE 

This course examines the important influence that existential philosophy 
has come to have upon the development of psychotherapy. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the contributions to psychotherapy made by the 
existential analysis and interpretation of individual experience in a crisis 
society. The authors studied will be: Paul Tillich, Ludwig Binswanger, 
Medard Boss, Thomas Hora, F. J. J. Buytendijk, Rollo May and Eugene 
Kahn. NEWBOLD 

(Spring) 



CMM 518: PRACTICUM IN LITURGY 

An examination of the theology and the general principles pertaining 
to liturgical celebration and the proper role of the minister in liturgy. 
Study of ritual and practical considerations in the celebration of wedding, 
funeral and sacramental liturgies. Practical, moral, canonical and pastoral 
considerations pertaining to the sacrament of penance. Special treat- 
ment of the principles of Eucharistic celebration. Individual practical 
exercises in administration of penance and celebration of Eucharist. Year- 
ly. STAFF 

(Spring) 



57 



CMM 522: THEORY OF GROUP DYNAMICS 

The course will be a theoretical treatment of the various types of groups 
in which a minister may find it possible to minister, of the dynamics at 
work in such groups, and of what the minister may hope to accomplish 
in such groups. SKERRY 
3 r (Winter) 



CMM 530: READINGS IN AREA STUDIES 

Individually guided reading program in the history and culture of specific 
countries, as well as their present social, economic and religious situa- 
tions. BOBERG 

(Winter) 



CMM 540: CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS I 

A seminar that investigates the relation of mission to colonialism and 
the problems in a post-colonial period of nationalism. Individual stu- 
dents will be expected to concentrate on one country or area. BOBERG 
r (Winter) 



CMM 550: THEOLOGY OF PREACHING 

An investigation of the biblical and theological foundations of the 
meaning and importance of preaching. A study of the phenomenology 
of human speech in an attempt to correlate the biblical and theological 
with today s preacher. Yearly. SKE ^n 



CMM 590: DISCERNMENT OF PRIESTLY AND RELIGIOUS 
VOCATION 

R. Hostie's book, The Discernment of Vocation will be the basic text 
for this course which will look at the question of vocational discern- 
ment from a) the theological point of view (what is a vocation, how 
can it be understood in a world of changing roles), b) from the canon- 
ical point of view (how does the Church deal with those called and what 
does she require) and c) from the guidance point of view (how can 
we as priests and ministers help a person understand God's call). 

ISABELL 
(Winter) 



CMM 597: INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Content and structure by arrangement. 



58 



CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 
(CCTS) 



The following programs of concentration in preparation for ministry are 
being offered cooperatively by the member schools of the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools in 1973-1974. For full details of these programs 
see the CCTS Announcements 1973-1974, pages 8-18. 

CCTS 400: PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION: BASIC CORE UNIT 

ANDERSON, VANASSE, WAY 
(Winter) 

CCTS 420: SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION: BASIC CORE UNIT 

BENNE, MILLER, OHLMANN, 
THOMPSON, TUITE 
(Fall and Winter) 

CCTS 440: CELEBRATION: BASIC CORE UNIT 

MILLER, SEARS, SNYDER, PIACITELLI 

(Winter) 

CCTS 460: CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION: BASIC 
CORE UNIT 

BOBERG, HARDON, LOISKANDL, 
SCHERER, GEANEY 
(Spring) 



59 



STUDENTS REGISTERED 



1972-1973 
FIRST YEAR PROGRAM 



NAME 

Aalen, J. 
Alfvegren, G. 
Beirne, P. 

Bossie, R. 
Brick, J. 
Clark, D. 
Crowley, T. 
Dexel, D. 
Doctor, J. 
Dreffein, L. 
Fowler, M. 
Grieshaber, R. 
Halstead, J. 
Harrington, H. 
Hartway, A. 
Hochstatter, T. 
Holthaus, J. 
Huels, J. 
Hutchins, M. 
Jablonski, J. 
Joeright, G. 
Keliher, M. 
Kramer, R. 

Lakey, A. 

Lenchak, T. 

Lewandowski, A. 

McCormick, J. 

McDevitt, T. 

Marzacano, R. 

Mudd, J. 

Murphy, P. 

O'Donnell, W. 

O'Neill, M. 

Padilla, R. 

Paduch, F. 

Pearson, A. 

Rausch, J. 

Roman, M. 



COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 



HOME 



CP. Heame, Texas 

CP. Whittier, California 

S.V.D. Brisbane, Queensland, 
Australia 

GS.J. Boston, Massachusetts 

S.V.D. Victoria, Australia 

Green Bay, Wisconsin 

C.S.Sp. Jackson, Michigan 

C.S.Sp. Royal Oak, Michigan 

O.F.M. Mokena, Illinois 

O.F.M. Chicago, Illinois 

O.F.M. Petosky, Michigan 

O.S.A. Palos Hills, Illinois 

O.S.A. Flint, Michigan 

C.M.F. Midland, Michigan 

C.PP.S. Matteson, Illinois 

O.F.M. Mendota, Illinois 

S.V.D. Decorah, Iowa 

O.S.M. St. Louis, Missouri 

S.V.D. Dubuque, Iowa 

M.S.C Youngstown, Ohio 

O.F.M. Middleburg Heights, Ohio 

C.S.V. Kankakee, Illinois 

S.V.D. Waukegan, Illinois 

New York, New York 

S.V.D. Cleveland, Ohio 

O.F.M. Chicago, Illinois 

O.S.A. Chicago, Illinois 

CP. Louisville, Kentucky 
Yonkers, New York 

CP. Louisville, Kentucky 

O.S.A. Chicago, Illinois 

C.PP.S. Cleveland, Ohio 

C.S.Sp. Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

CP. Texas City, Texas 

O.S.A. Chicago, Illinois 

Des Moines, Iowa 

O.F.M. St. Louis, Missouri 

O.F.M. San Antonio, Texas 



60 



Scholbrock, D. 


S.V.D. 


Hawkeye, Iowa 


Schork, J. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


Schramm, M. 


S.V.D. 


Dyersville, Iowa 


Skripsky, D. 


O.F.M. 


Omaha, Nebraska 


Smith, M. 


C.PP.S. 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Spangenberg, G. 


CS.Sp. 


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


Stocker, O. 


O.F.M. 


Jordan, Minnesota 


Tebbe, T. 


S.V.D. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Torma, A. 


M.S.C. 


Ashtabula, Ohio 


Vargas, E. 


S.V.D. 


New York, New York 


Weber, M. 


O.Praem. 


Lake Benton, Minnesota 


Willenborg, H. 


O.F.M. 


Teutopolis, Illinois 



UPPER LEVEL DEGREE CANDIDATES 



COMMUNITY 


OR 


DEGREE 


NAME 


DIOCESE 




CAIN DJLL/ACl 


Aldworth, T. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Alves, J. 




Markham, Illinois 


M.A. 


Anich, K. 


S.V.D. 


Mukwonago, Wisconsin • 


M.Div. 


Baker, J. 


M.S.C. 


Lebanon, Pennsylvania 


M.Div.* 


Balik, L. 




Ft. Atkinson, Iowa 


M.Div. 


Ballard, J. 


O.F.M. 


Memphis, Tennessee 


M.A. 


Bartz, J. 


O.F.M. 


Hobart, Indiana 


M.A., M.Div. 


Bauer, D. 


S.V.D. 


Toledo, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Bernard, R. 


S.V.D. 


St. Martinsville, La. 


M.Div. 


Bilski, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Bou, P. 


S.V.D. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Brennan, P. 


CP. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


M.Div.* 


Budenholzer, F. 


S.V.D. 


Claredon Hills, Illinois 


M.A. 


Bujnowski, P. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Byrnes, W. 


CS.Sp. 


Levittown, Pennsylvania 


M.Div. 


Callahan, V. 


O.F.M. 


Bridgeport, Connecticut 


M.Div. 


Campbell, J. 


M.S.C. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


M.A., M.Div.* 


Carlos, J. 


O.F.M. 


Joliet, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Capalbo, K. 


O.F.M. 


Bellwood, Illinois 


M.A., M.Div. 


Certik, R. 


CP. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div.* 


Charbonneau, G. 


O.S.M. 


Detroit, Michigan 


M.Div. 


Chenevey, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Canal Fulton, Ohio 


M.A., M.Div. 


Coens, F. 


O.F.M. 


Quincy, Illinois 


M.Div.* 



Degree conferred May, 1973 



61 



Cornelia, G. 


C.PP.S. 


CYvnlev 


CP. 


f^onrad F 

V>VJ11JI till, X • 


S.V.D. 


CYvf+inffham D. 


CS.Sp. 


Cur ran, D. 


O.S.A. 


DaCorte A. 




Dean, E. 


O.F.M. 


Df^fifpnhaiiph X 


O.S.A. 


Dpnissen F 


O.Praem. 




M.S.C. 


Dobucki K 


O.F.M. 


Donovan 


O.Praem. 


Feldner W 


S.V.D. 


X C J. 1 OX\V j X » 


O.F.M. 


Field, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Fisrher A 


O.F.M. 


Gins, P. 


O.S.M. 






Grubb, F. 


O.Praem. 


Guillory, C. 


S.V.D. 


Guimon, M. 


O.S.M. 


Haney, M. 


O.F.M. 


Hayes, R. L. 


C.M.F. 


Hilgert, E. T. 

O 9 • »/ 


CP. 


Hoffman, G. 


C.PP.S. 


Horstman, J. 


S.V.D. 


Jadgchew, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Jagdfeld, L. 


O.F.M. 


Janik, E. 


S.V.D. 


Jenkins, A. 


S.V.D. 


Jeschke, R. 


S.V.D. 


Kavcak, J. 


M.S.C 


Kesterson, J. 


O.F.M. 


Kohn, M. 


CS.Sp. 


Kolega, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Korolewski, L. 


S.S.M. 


Krantz, E. 


C.PP.S. 


Langenkamp, J. 


CPP.S. 


Legania, R. 


S.V.D. 


Leschak, M. 


S.V.D. 


Luebbert, S. 


CP. 


McCabe, M. 


O.F.M. 


McCarthy, D. 


O.S.M. 


McGrath, R. 


O.S.A. 


McQuillan, C. 


CS.Sp. 



* Degree conferred May, 



Waukegan, Illinois 

Chicago, Illinois 

Girard, Pennsylvania 

Jacksonville, Alabama 

Dublin, Ireland 

Chicago, Illinois 

Nashville, Tennessee 

St. Louis, Missouri 

DePere, Wisconsin 

Windsor, Ont, Canada 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Blue Island, Illinois 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Parma, Ohio 

Falls Church, Virginia 

Trenton, Illinois 
Columbus, Ohio 
Epping, N.S.W., Australia 
Santa Fe, New Mexico 
Lafayette, Louisiana 
Franklin Park, Illinois 
Columbus, Nebraska 
Dunkirk, New York 
Mason, Michigan 
Hermiston, Oregon 
Cloverdale, Ohio 
Parma, Ohio 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Elyria, Ohio 
Palm Desert, California 
Elmhurst, Illinois 
Nazareth, Pennsylvania 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Detroit, Michigan 
Chicago, Illinois 
Fairmont, Minnesota 
Atwater, Ohio 
St. Henry, Ohio 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Florissant, Missouri 
Madison Lake, Minnesota 
County Cork, Ireland 
Chicago, Illinois 
Staten Island, New York 



M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.A. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.A., M.Div. 

M.A. 

M.Div.* 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.A. 

M.Div. 

M.A., M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div.* 

M.A., M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div* 

M.A. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.Div. 

M.A., M.Div. 

M.A. 

M.Div* 

M.Div. 



62 



Martine2, Vidal 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Massaro, R. 


CS.Sp. 


Norbert, Pennsylvania 


M.A., M.Div. 


Matzke, J. 


O.Praem. 


West DePere, Wisconsin 


M.A.* 


Mencsik, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Troy, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Merten, T. 




Omaha, Nebraska 


M.Div. 


Monzyk, J. 


CP. 


Washington, Missouri 


M.A. 


Murphy, B. 


S.V.D. 


Dublin, Ireland 


M.A., M.Div. 


Nairn, T. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.A., M.Div. 


O'Grady, D. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Ohner, J. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div.* 


Overmann, J. 


S.V.D. 


Jesup, Iowa 


M.Div. 


Patten, P. 


CS.Sp. 


Detroit, Michigan 


M.Div. 


Pawlicki, J 


S.V.D. 


Bay City, Michigan 


M.Div.* 


Petermeier, V. 


O.S.C. 


Melrose, Minnesota 


M.A. 


Pichitino, J. 


CPP.S. 


Carlsbad, New Mexico 


M.A. 


Pins, H. 


S.V.D. 


Earlville, Iowa 


M.A.* 


Poppe, D. 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


M.Div. 


Pszczola, R. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Reithmaier, P. 


O.S.M. 


Frankfort, Illinois 


M.Div. 


Riebe, G. 


S.V.D. 


Gardena, California 


M.A. 


Rockford, E. 


S.V.D. 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


M.Div. 


Romero, R. 


O.S.M. 


Durango, Mexico 


M.Div. 


Runde, L. 


O.F.M. 


Teutopolis, Illinois 


M.A. 


Ryan, J. 


CP. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Schwieterman, D. 


Celina, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Sieg, R. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Simon, M. 




La Monte, Missouri 


M.Div.* 


Spencer, W. 


O.F.M. 


West Monroe, Louisiana 


M.Div. 


Stack, J. 


CPP.S. 


Whiting, Indiana 


M.A.* 


Steck, D. 


O.Praem. 


East DePere, Wisconsin 


M.A. 


Steinbrunner, J. 


CPP.S. 


St. Henry, Ohio 


M.Div.* 


Stith, E. 




Akron, Ohio 


M.A. 


Studer, F. 


O.S.B. 


Collegeville, Minnesota 


M.A. 


Szukala, J. 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.Div.* 


Taylor, D. 


Pittsburgh 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


M.A., M.Div. 


Thoman, J. 


CP. 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Thompson, J. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


M.A. 


Uroda, S. 


S.V.D. 


Detroit, Michigan 


M.Div. 


Vadnal, R. 


S.V.D. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Vandervest, L. 


O.Praem. 


Luxemburg, Wisconsin 


M.A. 


Viti, J. 


M.S.C 


Nazareth, Pennsylvania 


M.A. 


Webber, D. 


CP. 


Des Moines, Iowa 


M.Div.* 


Weiman, M. 


CS.Sp. 


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 


M.Div. 


Will, R. 


C.PP.S. 


Chickasaw, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Winter, H. 


C.PP.S. 


Rensselaer, Indiana 


M.Div. 


Wolff, R. 


S.V.D. 


Dayton, Ohio 


M.Div. 


Zanrua, R. 


Manila 


Paco, Manila, Phillipine Is. 


M.A. 



* Degree conferred May, 1973 



63 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



NAME COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE HOME 

D'Angelo, A. C.S.J. Brooklyn, New York 

Friday, M. S.SJ. Stevens Point, Wisconsin 

Hackb'arth, E. O.Praem. Hilbert, Wisconsin 

King R. ' O.Carm. Chicago, Illinois 

Kjate, c. O.Praem. Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Ponic' j * O.Praem. Chicago, Illinois 

Smolinski, A. O.F.M. Cedar Lake, Wisconsin 



CONTINUING EDUCATION AUDITORS 

NAME COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 

Curtis, P. O.F.M. 

Domas, E. O.F.M. 

Lubanski, A. O.F.M. 

Luznicky, G. O.P. 

Malone, E. O.F.M. 

Paulus, D. O.F.M. 

Phillips, G. O.F.M. 

Towey, C. CP. 

Womack, W. CP. 

Zimmerman, J. O.F.M. 



64 



1973 

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 

123456 123 123 1234567 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 



MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST 

12345 121234567 1234 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER 

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 

2345678 789 10 11 12 13 456789 10 2345678 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 30 31 



1974 

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL 

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 

12345 12 12 123456 

6789 10 11 12 3456789 3456789 789 10 11 12 13 

13 14 15 16 17 13 19 10 1112 13 1415 16 10 1112 13 1415 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 17 13 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

27 28 29 30 31 24 25 28 27 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 

31 



MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST 

1234 1 123456 123 

56789 10 11 2345678 789 10 11 12 13 456789 10 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 13 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 27 23 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 
30 



SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER 

1234567 12345 12 1234567 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31